emotional range of a teaspoon
hogwarts pensieve owl post RSS




Just know there's someone out there praying for you! Stay strong. xoxo
-Anonymous

Thank you. <3

July 22, 2014 at 5:25 PM | Post Permalink



Numbing the pain for a while will make it worse when you finally feel it.

(Source: anderbrays)

Post by anderbrays (via ronaldweasl-y)
July 22, 2014 at 5:00 PM | Post Permalink | 77 notes



horcrexes:

Potterpædia  The Golden Trio    {insp.}
Post by horcrexes (via youmustbemrsweasley)
July 22, 2014 at 1:47 PM | Post Permalink | 1,093 notes



the-outsiders-dishonor:

romy7:

celestialdeth:

misterkevo:

theadventuresofpam:

Harry was the favorite kid and he wasn’t even an official part of the family

Because Molly knows exactly how the Dursleys treat him. There’s no way Ron wouldn’t tell her. And Molly Weasley is a Mother. She gets a capital M because she is goddamn phenomenal at what she does. When she hears Harry Potter is on the train to Hogwarts in Book 1, her reaction isn’t to be starstruck. It’s to say “that poor dear had to come here all on his own.” Molly Weasley loves harder than anyone. She loves like it’s her sole reason for being. And when she hears there’s a poor boy who has never known love his whole life… how could she not?

In Year One Molly Weasley knit Harry a Weasley family sweater and made him homemade chocolate so he would have something to open on Christmas DON’T TOUCH ME

could I also just add that kids from abusive households tend to assume that yelling is directed at them and/or it heralds something bad for them so she’s making extra sure that he knows that this is not his fault and she’s not actually mad at him.

Post by mattkarens (via theblackship)
July 22, 2014 at 1:45 PM | Post Permalink | 468,693 notes



Post by a-night-in-wonderland (via nearlyheadlessnickcage)
July 21, 2014 at 11:14 PM | Post Permalink | 21,702 notes



Post by reallygoodmagical (via maibeisme)
July 21, 2014 at 11:14 PM | Post Permalink | 9,644 notes



Post by 5fifth (via maibeisme)
July 21, 2014 at 11:05 PM | Post Permalink | 85,456 notes



lissaraptor:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

 Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded



If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?
It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.
In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.
“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.
What does this mean?
In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.
However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.
These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.
In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.
This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:
How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?
Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.
How can a squib be born to wizard parents?
Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.
How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?
The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.
You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.




Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.



FAVOURITE THING

lissaraptor:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded

If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?

It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.

In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.

“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.

What does this mean?

In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.

However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.

These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.

In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.

This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:

How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?

Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.

How can a squib be born to wizard parents?

Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.

How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?

The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.

You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.

Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.

image

FAVOURITE THING

Post by mothernaturenetwork (via goshclarned-sillyface)
July 21, 2014 at 10:55 PM | Post Permalink | 106,381 notes



riddlemetom:

the 7th harry potter book was released july 21st 2007 that is exactly 7 years ago today

today’s the day to make a horcrux y’all

Post by riddlemetom (via ohmy-spock)
July 21, 2014 at 6:58 PM | Post Permalink | 41,757 notes



bookgeekconfessions:

booksandhotchocolate:

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows was released seven years ago - July 21, 2007.

I CANNOT BELIEVE THAT WAS 7 YEARS AGO!

Post by booksandhotchocolate (via aurarius)
July 21, 2014 at 12:27 PM | Post Permalink | 39,106 notes



Welcome to Platform 9¾ | 1 / 895 Next »








About Me



i am fallon. welcome to my tumblr. :)

hogwarts house: hufflepuff.

pottermore username: PurpleSparks101

HUFFLEPUFF
{ wear }
HOGWARTS
{ wear }



"Draco Dormiens
Nunquam Titillandus"




Following











Theme based on and images from Pottermore.com by J.K. Rowling
Originally coded for Tumblr by Jennifer at Tholaire. Modifcations for each house by Rachel Dana